Blog Updates

“It’s really easy to blame the body for any kind of negative emotion we have… the body is never the problem. We adjust the asana, we don’t blame the body. The asana should be made to fit the student, not the other way around. The body isn’t the problem. Either the prop is the problem or the puzzle, not the body… your body is not a problem, we’re just going to find a different way to do this… I’m going to make this practice work for the body that I’m in; we don’t have to change the body to come to the practice.” - Amber Karnes, The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction it isn’t just for Moms: a “coles notes” explanation. 

There is something about talking about “Pelvic Health” that makes people blush, however we owe it to ourselves to normalize the conversation

*This Blog post contains content that can be triggering for some readers.

Exercise never came easy to me.

In another life, I was an actor - health and fitness wasn't my jam. I once said that I would develop an eating disorder before I would ever step foot in a gym, which ended up being more true than I thought it would when I said it.

Flash forward and a career in health and fitness is a running gag in my family.

We all know exercise is good for you, and strength training is particularly beneficial though most people tend to shy away from it. Cardio and Yoga are the lead contenders for types of exercise students choose to participate in, however there are benefits to strength training that go beyond the obvious fat loss and muscle toning.
I know the importance of taking the time to rest, but it’s always easier said than done. I get wrapped up in the little free time I have with cleaning, cooking, and running my business. Sometimes my own practice, especially my Restorative practice, take a backseat to the tasks that to the hustle and bustle of everyday life. 
Becoming pregnant after having a miscarriage doesn’t always carry the same excitement for everyone. For me, it was filled with worry, anxiety, and desperately trying to avoid attachment - because I wouldn’t be able to handle another heartbreak.
Here I am sitting at my computer, 391/2 weeks pregnant, the day before my due date, it’s 7:01am. I have slept horribly for the last 4 nights and about 40 minutes ago gave up trying to catch a few extra fleeting moments of sleep. I also felt an overwhelming need to write about my past experience. Why today? Likely because I have found pregnancy and motherhood to have given me a much more honest perspective of myself and a newfound willingness to share. 
Social media showing off the latest super fit celebrity - 6 days after giving birth. Facebook saturated with advertisements to get your “pre-baby body” back; with this short workout and that drink supplement. Your physician saying it is safe to resume physical activity (usually at your 6 week checkup). How do we process all of that input? How much physical activity is safe to “resume”. Do you dive right into the most intense, full body fitness regime on the market? Or take it slower much slower?